Corey Vidal

YouTuber. Director. Jedi Knight.
"Who's the more foolish: the fool, or the fool who follows him?"
www.youtube.com/coreyvidal
ryanpanos:

Theater Series | Hiroshi Sugimoto | Socks Studio
Starting in the late 1970s, Hiroshi Sugimoto took pictures of cinemas interiors and drive-ins with the aim of encapsulate the whole lenght of a movie in a single shot. He left the camera shutters open throughout the running of a movie and the glowing screen of the cinemas was left as a trace on each take. A somehow uncanny light resonates in the dark cinema halls. At a further glance, this central light ethereally underlines the rich architectural details of the theater interiors. You might want to confront Sugimoto’s work with Michael Wesely’s, a photographer that uses to take photographs featuringi  3 years long exposures: read “The passing of time“, (on Socks).
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ryanpanos:

Theater Series | Hiroshi Sugimoto | Socks Studio
Starting in the late 1970s, Hiroshi Sugimoto took pictures of cinemas interiors and drive-ins with the aim of encapsulate the whole lenght of a movie in a single shot. He left the camera shutters open throughout the running of a movie and the glowing screen of the cinemas was left as a trace on each take. A somehow uncanny light resonates in the dark cinema halls. At a further glance, this central light ethereally underlines the rich architectural details of the theater interiors. You might want to confront Sugimoto’s work with Michael Wesely’s, a photographer that uses to take photographs featuringi  3 years long exposures: read “The passing of time“, (on Socks).
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ryanpanos:

Theater Series | Hiroshi Sugimoto | Socks Studio
Starting in the late 1970s, Hiroshi Sugimoto took pictures of cinemas interiors and drive-ins with the aim of encapsulate the whole lenght of a movie in a single shot. He left the camera shutters open throughout the running of a movie and the glowing screen of the cinemas was left as a trace on each take. A somehow uncanny light resonates in the dark cinema halls. At a further glance, this central light ethereally underlines the rich architectural details of the theater interiors. You might want to confront Sugimoto’s work with Michael Wesely’s, a photographer that uses to take photographs featuringi  3 years long exposures: read “The passing of time“, (on Socks).
Zoom
Info
ryanpanos:

Theater Series | Hiroshi Sugimoto | Socks Studio
Starting in the late 1970s, Hiroshi Sugimoto took pictures of cinemas interiors and drive-ins with the aim of encapsulate the whole lenght of a movie in a single shot. He left the camera shutters open throughout the running of a movie and the glowing screen of the cinemas was left as a trace on each take. A somehow uncanny light resonates in the dark cinema halls. At a further glance, this central light ethereally underlines the rich architectural details of the theater interiors. You might want to confront Sugimoto’s work with Michael Wesely’s, a photographer that uses to take photographs featuringi  3 years long exposures: read “The passing of time“, (on Socks).
Zoom
Info
ryanpanos:

Theater Series | Hiroshi Sugimoto | Socks Studio
Starting in the late 1970s, Hiroshi Sugimoto took pictures of cinemas interiors and drive-ins with the aim of encapsulate the whole lenght of a movie in a single shot. He left the camera shutters open throughout the running of a movie and the glowing screen of the cinemas was left as a trace on each take. A somehow uncanny light resonates in the dark cinema halls. At a further glance, this central light ethereally underlines the rich architectural details of the theater interiors. You might want to confront Sugimoto’s work with Michael Wesely’s, a photographer that uses to take photographs featuringi  3 years long exposures: read “The passing of time“, (on Socks).
Zoom
Info
ryanpanos:

Theater Series | Hiroshi Sugimoto | Socks Studio
Starting in the late 1970s, Hiroshi Sugimoto took pictures of cinemas interiors and drive-ins with the aim of encapsulate the whole lenght of a movie in a single shot. He left the camera shutters open throughout the running of a movie and the glowing screen of the cinemas was left as a trace on each take. A somehow uncanny light resonates in the dark cinema halls. At a further glance, this central light ethereally underlines the rich architectural details of the theater interiors. You might want to confront Sugimoto’s work with Michael Wesely’s, a photographer that uses to take photographs featuringi  3 years long exposures: read “The passing of time“, (on Socks).
Zoom
Info
ryanpanos:

Theater Series | Hiroshi Sugimoto | Socks Studio
Starting in the late 1970s, Hiroshi Sugimoto took pictures of cinemas interiors and drive-ins with the aim of encapsulate the whole lenght of a movie in a single shot. He left the camera shutters open throughout the running of a movie and the glowing screen of the cinemas was left as a trace on each take. A somehow uncanny light resonates in the dark cinema halls. At a further glance, this central light ethereally underlines the rich architectural details of the theater interiors. You might want to confront Sugimoto’s work with Michael Wesely’s, a photographer that uses to take photographs featuringi  3 years long exposures: read “The passing of time“, (on Socks).
Zoom
Info
ryanpanos:

Theater Series | Hiroshi Sugimoto | Socks Studio
Starting in the late 1970s, Hiroshi Sugimoto took pictures of cinemas interiors and drive-ins with the aim of encapsulate the whole lenght of a movie in a single shot. He left the camera shutters open throughout the running of a movie and the glowing screen of the cinemas was left as a trace on each take. A somehow uncanny light resonates in the dark cinema halls. At a further glance, this central light ethereally underlines the rich architectural details of the theater interiors. You might want to confront Sugimoto’s work with Michael Wesely’s, a photographer that uses to take photographs featuringi  3 years long exposures: read “The passing of time“, (on Socks).
Zoom
Info

ryanpanos:

Theater Series | Hiroshi Sugimoto | Socks Studio

Starting in the late 1970s, Hiroshi Sugimoto took pictures of cinemas interiors and drive-ins with the aim of encapsulate the whole lenght of a movie in a single shot. He left the camera shutters open throughout the running of a movie and the glowing screen of the cinemas was left as a trace on each take. A somehow uncanny light resonates in the dark cinema halls. At a further glance, this central light ethereally underlines the rich architectural details of the theater interiors. You might want to confront Sugimoto’s work with Michael Wesely’s, a photographer that uses to take photographs featuringi  3 years long exposures: read “The passing of time“, (on Socks).

(via fishingboatproceeds)

I never wanted to revisit these memories

catahstrophic:

I never wanted to revisit these memories or share any of this. With anyone. I didn’t want to discuss it with friends. I didn’t want to talk about it with my boyfriend. I shoved it so far back into my head that I believed I could move on from it. And in time, I have. But sometimes things come out…

I wanted to comment about a post that catahstrophic shared on Tumblr earlier tonight. As a friend of mine, and someone whom I’ve known for years, I was very upset to hear about the things she shared, and respect how painful and brave that must have been to write.

Her post contains a lot of memories that she specifically stated she doesn’t want to revisit. I feel this is a time to give her a lot of support, and I don’t mean to challenge or debate specific points that she’s made, however I did want to provide some context and clarity to the parts that involved me.

Whitney and I met at VidCon in 2011, and became friends. There was a time, a few months after that, that I was out for dinner with some friends and had too much to drink. I was texting/flirting her and one of her friends (I was single at the time), and they - by Whitney’s own admission - played with me, kind of pranked me, and made me feel upset (I was also drunk). Tonight, I actually went and found those old texts (from August 29, 2011), and my immediate reaction was to text “Not cool,” swear once (*not* calling her a swear word), and stop replying. I knew I was drunk and upset, and decided the best thing to do was just stop. They both immediately apologized, and Whitney offered to make me some spaghetti and scratch my back. We didn’t talk for a few weeks, then went back to being friends.

In early 2013 I was in Los Angeles and she offered to let me and some friends stay at her house. We hung out with her and her brother for a few days. I was in an open relationship at the time. I clearly communicated to Whitney my relationship, and her and I ended up fooling around a bit (but didn’t sleep together). When I flew home, I told the person I was dating literally the very first night I got back. I feel like I should write more, but this is the truth. Providing more specific detail involves other people, and I feel it’s unfair to involve them or drag them into this.

Finally, the third thing I want to comment about is what upsets me the most. I don’t know where this came from, and I was never able to get details, but Whitney heard somehow that I was going around calling her “easy”. I can only simply state that not only have I never said that about her, I have never in my entire life used that word to describe any human being. It’s not a word I use. It’s not in my vocabulary. I never said that. To further elaborate, I never even said anything similar, that might imply anything like that about her, or speak disrespect or ill of her at any time. She was my friend, and she was genuinely a good friend I enjoyed spending time with. When she confronted me about it, I was completely shocked and baffled. I didn’t have any big long stories or excuses. I was literally like “I have no idea where that’s coming from. I never said that. I would never say that.” I wish there was more to write, or an excuse to give, but it really just is that simple.

Anyways, Whitney’s post is very important, and I in no way seek to discredit her, accuse her, or cast any doubt. I wasn’t perfect in our friendship, and I see how I caused confusion, pain, and unnecessary drama in her life. I am very sorry for this, and I really hope I’m not adding more now. I wish her nothing but the very best.

An Open Letter to Sam Pepper

lacigreen:

Hi Sam!

Thanks for taking the time to read this letter.  As fellow YouTubers, we have much respect for others who put so much hard work into building their channel.  It’s not easy, and you should be proud!  That said, we’ve noticed that in your success, there has been a lack of respect in return…namely, for women and girls.

You may have noticed that your latest video “Fake Hand Ass Pinch Prank” has garnered considerable negative attention.  In this video, you sexually violate a number of unsuspecting women on the street, many of whom are visibly confused and upset at being touched by you without permission.  One woman even says “I don’t like that!” while you proceed to laugh and touch her more.  In “How to Make Out with Strangers”, made a year ago, you pressure women on camera to make out with you - again, many of whom are visibly uncool with it.  Confused and caught off guard, they painfully follow through with your requests, clearly uncomfortable.  In “How to Pick Up Girls with a Lasso”, you physically restrain women on the street with lassos - many of whom look alarmed to be restrained by a stranger.

You’d probably be alarmed too, wouldn’t you?  Imagine someone on the street comes up and rubs their hand on your bottom, or a girl walks up to you with a camera and forces her mouth onto yours while you’re trying to figure out what’s going on.  Imagine walking down the alley alone, when a guy much larger than you physically restrains you with rope and pulls you toward him.  You probably wouldn’t like it, right?

People don’t like to be violated and they don’t like to see their friends and girlfriends be violated either (hence the group of men that tried to beat you up in the lasso video).  And yet, history suggests that perhaps you find this humorous.  It is very disturbing that we live in a world where the violation of women and girls’ bodies is not only funny, but profitable, and can garner considerable notoriety and views on YouTube.

We are deeply disturbed by this trend and would like to ask you, from one creator to another, to please stop.  Please stop violating women and making them uncomfortable on the street for views.  Please stop physically restraining them and pressuring them to be sexual when they are uncomfortable.  Please show some respect for women’s right to their own bodies.  While it may seem like harmless fun, a simple prank, or a “social experiment”, these videos encourage millions of young men and women to see this violation as a normal way to interact with women.  1 in 6 young women (real life ones, just like the ones in your video) are sexually assaulted, and sadly, videos like these will only further increase those numbers.

We realize that people make mistakes, and that sometimes it’s hard to see the ripple effect of one’s actions.  We really hope that you will take a step back and consider the power you have to be someone who makes the world a better place.  It’s not too late to make a change!  We invite you to join us in ending widespread bodily violation that takes place in so many forms all around in the world.

Thanks so much.

Laci GreenMeghan TonjesTyler OakleyTomSkaViHartALBRoss EverettMatt LiebermanMeg TurneyTom FlynnTyrannosaurus LexArielle ScarcellaDan at NerdCubedRachel WhitehurstHannah Witton, Jefferson Bethke, MusicalBethan, Kaleb Nation, Chris Thompson, Michael Buckley, Jared Oban, Liam Dryden, Sanne Vliegenthart, Bryarly Bishop, Nicola Foti, Chescaleigh, Grace Helbig, Wheezy Waiter, Morgan Paige, Nathan Z., MumboJumbo, Miles Jai, Adorian Deck, Alli Speed, Matthew Santoro, Jaclyn Glenn, Hank Green, Rosianna Rojas, Grayson, Taryn Southern, Carrie Hope Fletcher, Adam Hattan, Drew Monson, Josh Sundquist, Mamrie Hart, Strawburry17, Catie Wayne, Hannah Hart, Catrific, Connor Manning, Emily Graslie, Sarah Weichel, Jack Howard, Louise Sprinkleofglitter, Mr. Repzion, John Green, Rob Dyke, Dean Dobbs, Charlie McDonnell, Wil Wheaton, Mitch & Greg at AsapSCIENCE

[MORE COSIGNERS TO COME.  SHARE/REBLOG TO SIGN!]

Co-signed.

meghantonjes:

baragoddess:

I can’t lie, out of all of the YouTubers I watched as a teen, I still like Meghan Tonjes but she seems to be all buddy buddy with shitty ppl like John Green and Tyler Oakley, so has she done problematic things?

I’m friends with a lot of people. All of them have said or done problematic things publicly or privately because they are human beings. We fuck up. It’s in our nature. I fuck up daily, sometimes in ways I don’t see as fuck ups because my truth, my experience and my understanding are limited. Ive only had positive interactions with John Green and Tyler Oakley, two people who have always been incredibly supportive and loving to me. It’s hard to label people as “shitty people”. It’s subjective. Conflates who people intrinsically are with what we publicly interpret them to be, without personal knowledge of those actual people. We can disagree with each other’s work, methods of expression. We can critique that work, talk about why it’s problematic, why we take issue with it, what we think it says in the greater narrative. But, to label people who are working in a public sphere, who are charitable and work to make themselves better people as well as the lives of strangers as “shitty people”…it’s a tough one. 

Within all of our most intimate thoughts, writings, recordings, conversations we are all problematic and we should show the same kindness, respect and eagerness to teach and help to others as we would want ourselves. 

(Source: absoluteweeaboopalyspe, via karenkavett)

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